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Recent Posts

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11
WinMx World News / Re: Internet Censorship In The UK ?
« Last post by White Stripes on June 13, 2017, 10:27:18 pm »
Quote
Theresa May and her colleagues have been pushing to break real encryption as part of the party's manifesto.

so what about medical records/prescriptions, credit/debit/savings info, personal info that identity thieves love?...... is that going to be sent plain text? we dont want anything encrypted after all...

btw Theresa, encryption is just math... plan on banning pen paper and counting on fingers? oh and of course those notorious pocket calculators... they do math quickly so we have to ban those too....

</rant>

im actually quite curious about TLS/SSL ... if i bought something online from the UK with my credit card is it actually going to be secure?
12
WinMx World News / Re: Internet Censorship In The UK ?
« Last post by GhostShip on June 13, 2017, 05:46:29 am »
The circle is now complete it seems..

https://www.techdirt.com/articles/20170611/11545237565/theresa-may-tries-to-push-forward-with-plans-to-kill-encryption-while-her-party-plots-via-encrypted-whatsapp.shtml

Quote
As we've discussed a few times, Theresa May and her colleagues have been pushing to break real encryption as part of the party's manifesto. And they've used recent terrorist attacks as an excuse to ramp up that effort -- even though the perpetrators of recent attacks were already known to law enforcement and there's no evidence encryption played any role. Earlier in the year, Home Secretary Amber Rudd had insisted that encrypted communications were completely unacceptable, and specifically namechecked Whatsapp:

Theresa May's own party has been trying to figure out what the hell they're going to do. And, of course, the way they're communicating with each other is with the encrypted Whatsapp software that Amber Rudd was trashing just months ago:

 Former minister Ed Vaizey told the BBC that he supports May staying on, but that Tories were discussing possible replacements. Asked whether members were calling one another to plot May’s ouster this weekend, he denied it.b “That’s so 20th century,” he said. “It’s all on WhatsApp.”


It seems they appreciate the privacy of  encrypted messenger systems for their own purposes but wish the public to leave their doors open to criminals and worse.


13
WinMx World News / Re: Internet Censorship In The UK ?
« Last post by GhostShip on June 05, 2017, 10:15:29 pm »
Another article on this important matter.

http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/technology-40158149
14
WinMx World News / Re: Internet Censorship In The UK ?
« Last post by GhostShip on June 05, 2017, 05:48:44 am »
It seems I am not the only one with serious concerns.

http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/business-40149649

Quote
Prime Minister Theresa May has been warned that her promise to tighten regulation on tech firms after the London attacks will not work.
Mrs May said areas of the internet must be closed because tech giants provided a "safe space" for terrorist ideology.
But the Open Rights Group said social media firms were not the problem, while an expert in radicalisation branded her criticism "intellectually lazy".
Twitter, Facebook and Google said they were working hard to fight extremism.

Google (which owns Youtube) Facebook (which owns WhatsApp) and Twitter were among tech companies already facing pressure to tackle extremist content - pressure that intensified on Sunday. Mrs May said: "We cannot allow this ideology the safe space it needs to breed. "Yet that is precisely what the internet, and the big companies... provide."

On ITV's Peston on Sunday, Home Secretary Amber Rudd said an international agreement was needed for social media companies to do more to stop radicalisation.
"One (requirement) is to make sure they do more to take down the material that is radicalising people," Mrs Rudd said.
"And secondly, to help work with us to limit the amount of end-to-end encryption that otherwise terrorists can use," she said.


But the Open Rights Group, which campaigns for privacy and free speech online, warned that politicians risked pushing terrorists' "vile networks" into the "darker corners of the web" by more regulation. "The internet and companies like Facebook are not the cause of hate and violence, but tools that can be abused. "While governments and companies should take sensible measures to stop abuse, attempts to control the internet is not the simple solution that Theresa May is claiming," Open Rights said.

Professor Peter Neumann, director of the International Centre For The Study Of Radicalisation at King's College London, was also critical of Mrs May.
He wrote on Twitter: "Big social media platforms have cracked down on jihadist accounts, with result that most jihadists are now using end-to-end encrypted messenger platforms e.g. Telegram.
"This has not solved problem, just made it different... moreover, few people (are) radicalised exclusively online. Blaming social media platforms is politically convenient but intellectually lazy."

However, Dr Julia Rushchenko, a London-based research fellow at the Henry Jackson Centre for Radicalisation and Terrorism, told the BBC that Mrs May was right, and that more could be done by tech giants to root out such content.
She felt that the companies erred on the side of privacy, not security. "We all know that social media companies have been a very helpful tool for hate preachers and for extremists," Dr Rushchenko said.

The online world had been a recruiting aid for foreign fighters, and social media needed "stricter monitoring", both by government agencies and by third party groups that have been created to flag up extremist content.
However, the major social media firms said on Sunday that they were working hard to rid their networks of terrorist activity and support.

Facebook said: "Using a combination of technology and human review, we work aggressively to remove terrorist content from our platform as soon as we become aware of it - and if we become aware of an emergency involving imminent harm to someone's safety, we notify law enforcement."

Google said it was "committed to working in partnership with the government and NGOs to tackle these challenging and complex problems, and share the government's commitment to ensuring terrorists do not have a voice online".

It said it was already working on an "international forum to accelerate and strengthen our existing work in this area" and had invested hundreds of millions of pounds to fight abuse on its platforms.

Twitter said "terrorist content has no place on" its platform.
"We continue to expand the use of technology as part of a systematic approach to removing this type of content.
"We will never stop working to stay one step ahead and will continue to engage with our partners across industry, government, civil society and academia."

Analysis: Joe Lynam, BBC business correspondent

Calling for technology companies to "do more" has become one of the first responses by politicians after terror attacks in their country.

Theresa May's comments on that subject were not new - although the tone was.She has already proposed a levy on internet firms, as well as sanctions on firms for failing to remove illegal content, in the Conservative party manifesto published three weeks ago.

Given that 400 hours of videos are uploaded onto Youtube every minute, and that there are 2 billion active Facebook users, clamping down on sites which encourage or promote terror needs a lot of automatic detection - as well as the human eye and judgement.

15
WinMx World News / Internet Censorship In The UK ?
« Last post by GhostShip on June 04, 2017, 02:13:37 pm »
Today saw yet another religously themed terror attack, many have been injured and some lost there lives, I am sure all peaceful folks are disgusted by such attrocites and will stand strong in the face of mindless violent activities, however this post is not about feeding the terrorists any further air of publicity it's more to share my concerns with you all in the aftermath of yesterdays London attack. Theresa May the Prime Minister of the UK has spoken of "shutting down parts of the internet ", this kind of talk has the potential to affect me directly unlike the terrorist attacks, it's also my view that to "jump" when such attacks take place rather than to remain strong and carry on as normal only makes the attackers more bold next time knowing that their activities are causing real change in our society, if we alter our behaviour or system of governance to suit the terrorist agenda we have lost.

I use an encrypted messenger service to talk to some of the staff here and I am more than concerned that such systems will be blocked or broken by the government simply because they want to be seen to be doing something, often after the event rather than prior, when such changes are put into effect its the normal peaceful folks whom are affected , a more than miniscule number of murderers are thus allowed to dictate the direction of the majority of the populance, does this sound like standing up for our way of life ?

I expect to see further news in relation to this subject but following on from Theresa's recent proclamations (some going back to september last year) and the recent law change slipped in I think we can be assured that we are soon going to be facing a chinese style internet  within the UK using terrorist attacks as an excuse to curtail freedoms, I hope I am wrong but ever since she was home secretary and the authour of an infamous policy paper nicknamed by the press as "the snoopers charter" Theresa has had internet censorship on her mind, lets all work hard to ensure its effects are minimised and proportioate.

Thank you all for your time .

16
Winmxworld.com Strategic Directions / Re: WinMX final fix?
« Last post by wonderer on May 30, 2017, 09:36:41 pm »
more and more realize that, thanks to facebook :D
Hope we will find there the people we need to finish what we started.
17
WinMx World News / Re: European data protection laws are changing
« Last post by White Stripes on May 30, 2017, 05:33:07 pm »
Quote
And consent will mean active agreement. It can no longer be inferred from, say, a pre-ticked box. Companies that control how and why data is processed will have to show a clear audit trail of consent, including screen grabs or saved consent forms. Individuals also have the right to withdraw consent at any time, easily and swiftly. When somebody does withdraw consent, their details must be permanently erased, and not just deleted from a mailing list. GDPR gives individuals the right to be forgotten.

emphasis mine....

...why do i have a funny feeling facebooks lawyers are already cooking up a lawsuit of some type?
18
WinMx World News / Re: Microsoft Issue Wannacry Patch for XP Sp3
« Last post by White Stripes on May 30, 2017, 05:26:18 pm »
@ Stripes   theres a program called vuescan which might get that old scanner working. I put it on my dads win 7 machine a few years back to get his old 2001 epson scanner running. Its not free but u know....    ;)

https://www.hamrick.com/

i'll give it a peek for curiosities sake but i dont use windows anymore except for 98SE on oldschool hardware and an XP VM... the daily driver machines are all linux... i was dual booting linux and win7 but after some software replacements i found i simply no longer needed windows... wine runs winmx just fine if you ever get bit by the penguin yourself...
19
WinMx World News / European data protection laws are changing
« Last post by DaBees-Knees on May 30, 2017, 09:36:57 am »
Quote
In May next year, the Data Protection Act (DPA) will be replaced by the EU’s General Data Protection Regulation (GDPR), a framework with greater scope and much tougher punishments for those who fail to comply with new rules around the storage and handling of personal data. While this new framework comes into place as the UK enters the process of uncoupling from the EU, the Great Repeal Act means it it is likely to be converted into British law.

The DPA dates from the 1990s, and a time when only the largest companies had the means to collect and store significant amounts of data. In the intervening years, the ease and sophistication of data collection means that thousands of SMEs not only collect personal details, but store, move and access them online. Personal data is used in everything from sales to customer relationship management to marketing.

Cybercriminals have been quick to see the opportunity. In 2016, companies in the UK lost more than £1billion to cybercrime. Major data breaches have given criminals access to names, birthdates and addresses and even social security and pension information. Moreover, a recent report from the Federation of Small Businesses (FSB) claims that SMEs are now more likely to be targeted by cybercriminals than their large corporate counterparts. Cybercriminals consider SMEs softer targets than their well-defended corporate counterparts. Which is why the GDPR is considered long overdue by many authorities, and ignorance will be no defence for SMEs who fail to comply.

What does GDPR mean for SMEs?

Among many new conditions, one of the biggest changes SMEs will face concerns consent. Under the new regulations, companies must keep a thorough record of how and when an individual gives consent to store and use their personal data. And consent will mean active agreement. It can no longer be inferred from, say, a pre-ticked box. Companies that control how and why data is processed will have to show a clear audit trail of consent, including screen grabs or saved consent forms. Individuals also have the right to withdraw consent at any time, easily and swiftly. When somebody does withdraw consent, their details must be permanently erased, and not just deleted from a mailing list. GDPR gives individuals the right to be forgotten.

In the event of a data breach, GDPR forces companies to inform relevant authorities within 72 hours, giving full details of the breach and proposals for mitigating its effects. These new conditions alone – and there are many more – show just how demanding the new regulations will be for companies of all sizes. GDPR forces SMEs to know exactly what personal data they hold and where it is located (whether on PCs, on servers, or in the Cloud), and have procedures in place to ensure its complete removal when a request to do so is made. Monitoring protocols must be able to recognise and act on breaches as soon as they happen, and an incident recovery plan put in place to deal with the repercussions.

“Privacy by design and default is the cornerstone of the GDPR,” says Anita Bencsik, data security senior consultant at BT, which provides a consultancy service for businesses to check if they have got the right security in place. She adds: “This stipulates that — from the initial stages onwards — organisations must consider the impact that processing personal data can have on an individual’s privacy. This means, for example, that every new business process or product that could involve personal data or impact the privacy of an individual, must be designed in accordance with data protection requirements.”

Preparing for all this will require a full information audit and, for many companies, a change in culture, which SMEs should start to plan and implement well in advance of the 2018 deadline. Personal data is a key tool for SMEs looking to target and retain customers: GDPR means it must be handled with the utmost care.

Nice to know, but how effective it will be only time will tell.

Full article - http://www.telegraph.co.uk/
20
WinMx World News / Re: Microsoft Issue Wannacry Patch for XP Sp3
« Last post by reef on May 30, 2017, 07:03:33 am »
@ Stripes   theres a program called vuescan which might get that old scanner working. I put it on my dads win 7 machine a few years back to get his old 2001 epson scanner running. Its not free but u know....    ;)

https://www.hamrick.com/
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