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WinMX World :: Forum  |  Discussion  |  WinMx World News  |  Net approaches address exhaustion
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Author Topic: Net approaches address exhaustion  (Read 1268 times)

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Offline DaBees-Knees

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Net approaches address exhaustion
« on: January 30, 2011, 03:07:05 am »
http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/technology-12306573

Quote
The last big blocks of the net's dwindling stock of addresses are about to be handed out.

The event that triggers their distribution is widely expected to take place in the next few days. When that happens each of the five regional agencies that hand out net addresses will get one of the remaining blocks of 16 million addresses. The addresses in those last five blocks are expected to be completely exhausted by September 2011.

Final five

The trigger event will likely come from the agency that oversees net addresses in the Asia-Pacific region, a body known as Apnic.  When Apnic's store of addresses falls below a key threshold, said Geoff Huston, chief scientist at the agency, it will ask for more from the central repository - the Internet Assigned Numbers Authority (IANA).

"When IANA process this request that will leave it with five /8s in its pool," said Geoff Huston, chief scientist at the Asia Pacific registry. A "/8" is the biggest block of net addresses that IANA hands out and comprises about 16 million addresses. "That will trigger the IANA to activate its 'final /8' actions, which entail the IANA handing out a final /8 to each of the five regional internet registries," said Mr Huston.

IANA is expected to formally hand over the final five in a ceremony in mid-March that will signal the beginning of the end for this pool of addresses.

The internet was built on version 4 of the Internet Protocol (IPv4) which has an upper limit of about four billion addresses. In the 1970s when IPv4 was drawn up this seemed enough but the explosion in the use of the net has led to its rapid depletion.

Making plans
 
Axel Pawlik, managing director of RIPE which hands out net addresses in Europe, said he expected the entire stock to run dry in September 2011. "It might be earlier," he said "as we have had some quite significant growth." "There have been a lot of big requests for addresses," he said, "specifically in the US and Asia but that's not a surprise as they have all the people there and the growth too."

Mr Pawlik said Ripe and other regional registries have been rationing requests for addresses for some time. Enough addresses to last two years used to be given out, he said, but now it only supplied sufficient to last six months. The 16 million addresses in the last block /8 assigned to Europe could run out quickly, he said, as people woke up to the fact that there are not many left.

Plus, he said, Ripe and other agencies were planning to reserve a chunk of addresses for new entrants and to help with migration to the new addressing scheme - IP version 6 (IPV6).

While number of requests for IPv6 addresses was rising, said Mr Pawlik, it was not happening fast enough. "If you do not have any plans for IPv6 now you are irresponsible," said Mr Pawlik, "They should have that in place, if they do not have that by now something is going seriously wrong."

Mr Pawlik said there would not be chaos once the IPv4 addresses were used up. However, he said, it made sense to start switching as the technical work-arounds to cope with a lack of IPv4 addresses were unwieldy and limited.

"IPv6 is the solution," he said.

This situation has been flagged up for some time. This is just an update.  :gum:

Offline Bieb

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Re: Net approaches address exhaustion
« Reply #1 on: January 30, 2011, 03:37:26 am »
This whole ipv4 to ipv6 transition is going to be quite a trip.

When all the ipv4 addresses have been handed out to isps then either the government will force the large corporations and universities that were given millions and millions of addresses years ago that they don't actually need them to give them back to the IANA. Or those corporations and universities will sell those address blocks to the isp's who have the money to buy them.

If that is not done, or when that is done and there absolutely are no more ipv4 addresses to hand out isps will start proxying new users through their own proxy servers much like the mobile we does. Thousands of people assigned to the same ip address resulting in them not being connectable, and if one user gets banned off a certain forum or website, the hundreds or thousands of other users behind that ip will also not be able to access those areas of the web.

It really is an unfortunate situation that ipv6 is not backwards compatible and when all of the internet does decide to switch over it's not going to be a smooth situation.

We also need to keep in mind that the WinMX client itself is not ipv6 compatible, nor is the network protocol. There are many packets that depend on the ip address being 4 bytes and not 16 bytes..  So there is an end to the offical WinMX client in sight, but hopefully someone can develop a new network that takes advantage of the future of the internet that is just around the corner.



Offline Bluey_412

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Re: Net approaches address exhaustion
« Reply #2 on: January 30, 2011, 01:03:31 pm »
and my question is, how many IP's get recycled?

I might be missing something, but I suspect a lot of IP's get used awhile, drop out of use, and are just 'parked', unused, but 'reserved' for future use by the last owner/user...
What you think is important is rarely urgent
But what you think is Urgent is rarely important

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Offline White Stripes

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Re: Net approaches address exhaustion
« Reply #3 on: January 30, 2011, 10:13:03 pm »
Quote
but hopefully someone can develop a new network that takes advantage of the future of the internet that is just around the corner.

... been done ... but im not naming anything since it would start yet another damn flamewar on this forum... methinks the transition to ipv6 tho should be used to officially put the almost 7yr old winmx to bed... (secunia.com lists winmx as 'end of life' ... an understatement to say the least) since it will be quite a while longer before ipv4 is put to rest...

Quote
but I suspect a lot of IP's get used awhile, drop out of use, and are just 'parked', unused, but 'reserved' for future use by the last owner/user...

they go in and out of the pool quite often... as to how many and how often i dunno...


....the biggest pita after all this is said and done is going to be memorizing those 128bit long addresses X_x

Offline Bieb

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Re: Net approaches address exhaustion
« Reply #4 on: January 31, 2011, 12:38:20 am »
Quote
but hopefully someone can develop a new network that takes advantage of the future of the internet that is just around the corner.

... been done ... but im not naming anything since it would start yet another damn flamewar on this forum... methinks the transition to ipv6 tho should be used to officially put the almost 7yr old winmx to bed... (secunia.com lists winmx as 'end of life' ... an understatement to say the least) since it will be quite a while longer before ipv4 is put to rest...


Well I was talking specifically a new network for the winmx community, but I agree with what you said as well. Bit-torrent has been ready, and it is the latest and next generation as it's ever evolving.


Offline Bieb

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Re: Net approaches address exhaustion
« Reply #5 on: February 04, 2011, 02:20:17 am »
Quote
"To continue to grow their businesses, ISPs will need to deploy some form of IPv4 address sharing—NAT44, NAT64, or similar technologies," Dan Wing, distinguished engineer at Cisco Systems and the other BEHAVE chair told Ars. "IPv4 address sharing will be necessary until all of the content and servers on the Internet support IPv6, which will take many years. Users will still need to run servers at home—for webcams, television place shifting, and so on. To accommodate that need, the IETF is working on a protocol, PCP, which allows operating a server behind an IPv6 firewall and a carrier's NAT44 or NAT64."

http://arstechnica.com/tech-policy/news/2011/02/river-of-ipv4-addresses-officially-runs-dry.ars

Looks like today was the day the absolute last blocks were handed out to the regional agencies.

I quoted what I believe the main hurdle and problem is going to be on the change over. We are going to have large groups of people sharing the same ipv4 address, which is essentially a ISP proxy server. Which means you will not be able to forward ports, or be "connectable" on your ipv4 address.

I guess time will tell exactly how each isp is going to handle it, but it sure will have a large impact on the internet as we know it today and with older software like WinMX which is not capable of supporting ipv6 in it's binary form and network form.




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