gfxgfx
 
Please login or register.

Login with username, password and session length
 
gfx gfx
gfx
76615 Posts in 13449 Topics by 2077 Members - Latest Member: Kitkat April 16, 2021, 01:10:42 pm
*
gfx*gfx
gfx
WinMX World :: Forum  |  Discussion  |  WinMx World News  |  Some versions of Windows 7 worth it, others not
gfx
gfxgfx
 

Author Topic: Some versions of Windows 7 worth it, others not  (Read 1558 times)

0 Members and 1 Guest are viewing this topic.

Offline DaBees-Knees

  • WMW Team
  • *****
Some versions of Windows 7 worth it, others not
« on: July 16, 2009, 04:53:17 am »
http://WindowsSecrets.com/comp/090716

Quote
You need to make a few key decisions to ensure that you pick the Windows 7 version that best meets your needs.

It's safe to say the Vista version of Windows didn't set the world on fire, though it inflamed more than a few PC users. It's putting it politely to say there's pent-up demand for Vista's successor, Windows 7.

Before you can determine which of the many versions of Win7 is right for your computing situation, however, you need to know the strengths and weaknesses of each option. If you know the key decision points, it'll take you just a few minutes to determine which version of Windows 7 is right for you.

One caveat is in order: Nobody who has seen the final "gold code" version of Windows 7 is talking about it. Nor has anyone in a position to discuss it publicly laid eyes on a final upgrade version of Win7. What follows is based on my personal experience with the latest leaked builds.

Let's start with the Win7 versions that we can generally reject without much forethought at all:

Starter Edition comes preinstalled only on netbooks that meet certain restrictions. It has many user-interface limitations — as befits its rock-bottom price, which is intended to reduce the list price of new netbooks running Windows.

Starter won't play DVD movies. Hardware makers, however, will undoubtedly bundle DVD software such as PowerDVD or WinDVD with their optical drives. As an alternative, you could install the highly acclaimed free VLC media player and play movies till the cows come bungee-jumping home. You'll find a download link for the program on the VideoLAN site.

Bottom line: Starter works fine if you're on a budget. Before you choose that bare-bones edition, however, consider that Win7 Home Premium may be available on a netbook for not much more money than you'd pay for Starter.

Ultimate Edition is for people who have way too much money tearing a hole in their pockets. Avoid this version unless you desperately need the ability to scramble all the data on your hard drive (using MS's proprietary BitLocker) or you want to be able to change your copy of Windows so all of the menus, help files, dialog boxes, and so on appear in a different language (multilanguage support).

Actually, Ultimate is so expensive, it may be cheaper to buy a second copy of Windows 7 Home Premium in the second language you wish to use and dual-boot between the two versions.

The big decision is Win7 Home Premium vs. Pro

That brings us to the first of our two key purchase questions: Can you live with Windows 7 Home Premium, or do you really need the added features of Windows 7 Professional? It boils down to whether you're willing to pay the extra money for Premium's handful of extras.

The following items are the things you can do in Windows 7 Pro that you can't do in Windows 7 Home Premium:

Join a domain. If your PC needs to participate in an organization's "domain" network, you need Win7 Pro or Ultimate.

Back up to a network drive. Both Starter and Home Premium have fully functional backup and restore programs that run automatically with very little fuss. These two versions also maintain "shadow copies" or previous versions of files — snapshots typically taken once a day.

Windows 7 Pro adds the ability to store backups on your network. With Home Premium, you can store backups only on local drives, including removable drives. Of course, if you have Windows Home Server or some other form of network-based copying, you're already covered for remote backup.

Act as a Remote Desktop puppet. Every recent version of Windows includes the ability to control another PC via a feature called Remote Desktop. But to be able to have your PC be controlled — if you want it to act as a puppet, with another PC pulling the strings — it must be running a Pro or Ultimate release.

There are several free or low-cost services — notably LogMeIn Free and GoToMyPC — that pull off the same remote-access trick, and they don't require a Pro or Ultimate version of Windows.

Sync files offline. Windows 7 Pro's built-in file synchronizer lets you designate a file or folder on another networked computer as being "offline." That automatically sets up caching and updating, so the file(s) are updated every time you reconnect your computer to the network.

As you might imagine, there are many ways to sync files and folders, including Microsoft's own free SyncToy, which you can get from Microsoft's download page. SyncToy has many more features than Windows 7's built-in file syncher but doesn't work as easily.

Run in Windows XP Mode. In theory, this feature lets you run Windows XP programs — unaltered — on a Windows 7 Pro PC. This version includes a fully licensed copy of Windows XP and Windows Virtual PC.

In my July 2 column, I described Win7's XP Mode as a pig in a pre-release poke. If you really need to run an XP virtual machine, get the free VMware Player, which you'll find on the VMware site, and use an old retail copy of XP.

Encrypt files and connect to projectors. Among the other quasi-notable features in Windows 7 Pro are two that may interest you. The Encrypting File System offers strong encryption of files and folders, although many people use the encryption techniques already found in applications such as Word and Excel.

If you commonly give presentations, Win7 Pro lets you connect quickly to a network projector (by pressing WindowsKey+P) and automatically disable screensavers and IM clients for the duration of a presentation. Ho-hum.

If you can look at the above list of features and say, "meh," then Windows 7 Home Premium is for you.

Make the move from 32-bit Vista to 64-bit Win7

A far more-pertinent question for many current Vista users is whether they should upgrade to the 32-bit version of Win7 or install the 64-bit version. All indications are that both the 64-bit and 32-bit versions of Windows 7 will ship on the same DVD.

Keep in mind that if you opt for an in-place upgrade — which I recommend against — you must stick with the bittedness of the original product: an old 32-bit version of Windows will upgrade only to 32-bit Windows 7, and 64-bit only to 64-bit.

If your system uses an Intel Core 2 Duo/AMD Athlon 64 or newer processor, you can run 64-bit. But choosing between 32-bit and 64-bit Windows has more implications than you might think.

Yes, the 64-bit versions of Windows 7 can handle more memory — 32-bit versions top out around 3.4GB. Yes, 64-bit applications frequently run faster than their 32-bit brethren.

But the devil's in the drivers: many manufacturers adamantly refuse to spend the money to create 64-bit drivers for older hardware. After all, they make money by selling new hardware, and 64-bit compatibility doesn't rate very high on the profit-center scorecard.

Fortunately, there's an easy way to tell whether your Vista machine and its peripherals support 64-bit versions of Windows 7. Microsoft's Windows 7 Upgrade Advisor scans your computer and tells you whether Microsoft-approved 64-bit drivers are available for your equipment.

Addressing readers' Windows 7 questions

I received dozens of questions from readers following my July 2 article about Windows 7 upgrades.

One interesting conundrum on the minds of many future Win7 users is whether using the Windows 7 upgrade DVD to install Windows 7 invalidates your old copy of Vista or XP. While Microsoft's End-User License Agreement certainly implies that this is indeed the case, it remains to be seen whether Microsoft will actually "turn off" the old key.

That could become an important consideration on a dual-boot system with Windows 7 and Vista (or XP). It also raises the question of whether you can give up on Windows 7 and reinstall your old version of Vista or XP. Since we haven't seen the upgrade version yet, there's no way to tell for sure whether the old authorization key gets zapped. Stay tuned for details.

Several readers complained about the lack of in-place upgrade paths for Vista Ultimate. To recap, if you have Vista Ultimate installed, you can perform an in-place upgrade only to Windows 7 Ultimate, which costs two arms and three legs. The Microsoft Store verbiage on the topic is confusing. Rest assured that the picture I painted in my July 2 column is accurate — if you have Vista Ultimate, MS supports only an in-place upgrade to Windows 7 Ultimate.

About the only thing that's certain is that we're on the verge of an important new chapter in the history of Windows. Strap on your crash helmet and hold on tight!
 

I have said it before, nothing is ever simple with Microsoft.  :snore:

Offline Trestor

  • Forum Member
  • Your call is important to us ...
Re: Some versions of Windows 7 worth it, others not
« Reply #1 on: July 16, 2009, 05:12:50 am »
http://WindowsSecrets.com/comp/090716


One interesting conundrum on the minds of many future Win7 users is whether using the Windows 7 upgrade DVD to install Windows 7 invalidates your old copy of Vista or XP. While Microsoft's End-User License Agreement certainly implies that this is indeed the case, it remains to be seen whether Microsoft will actually "turn off" the old key.

That could become an important consideration on a dual-boot system with Windows 7 and Vista (or XP). It also raises the question of whether you can give up on Windows 7 and reinstall your old version of Vista or XP. Since we haven't seen the upgrade version yet, there's no way to tell for sure whether the old authorization key gets zapped. Stay tuned for details.

I currently run xp and Win7 as a dual boot. MS haven't turned off xp, but the night is young; maybe they'll do it when the sale version is released. W7 is a mixture of good and annoying features: it's fast and smooth in running and makes xp seem clunky in comparison. Yet MS have either hidden or removed a number of previous easily accessed features so it's hard or impossible to configure W7 to run the way I want it to.




Offline ñòóKýçrÕôK

  • my name is nooks, and I approve this message
  • MX Hosts
  • *****
  • Dream BIG, Live BIGGER!!
Re: Some versions of Windows 7 worth it, others not
« Reply #2 on: July 16, 2009, 03:14:34 pm »
64 bit Windows 7 certainly "cut off" my 32 bit Vista Ultimate and the only issue I had hardware wise was my sound card. They have 64 bit drivers for my sound card but Win7 didn't like them at all. I had to force feed it to my machine and even though it worked that way I couldn't use my custom surround control software to optimise the surround sound. Was totally incompatible to Win7. And 32 bit games will install and run on 64 bit Windows just in a seperate \Program Files\ folder than the 64bit stuff. Speed wise I didn't notice a single difference in speed between 32 bit Vista and 64 bit Windows 7. As for versions I don't get why they think they need all these various versions just to decide how much money they'll get for it. The smart user will know they can get the starter version at the cheap $$ and then just install programs that can handle any issues that any Windows 7 software can handle. Money wise I think that would be every users best bet. With Vista the only improvement between Ultimate and Home version were a couple games and the bitlocker and silverlight which can now be installed on pretty much any windows now but with Ultimate you paid like $150 more for that version.
When you wake up each morning always try to remember tomorrow is never your option, it's God's. Love like you want to. Live like you aren't afraid. And ALWAYS try to remember that even if it seems personal it's never as important as something you may have forgotten to do today.

WinMXWorld.com Help_AE182F4EBABE - For WinMX help or help on other pc related matters.
WinMXWorld.com Cafe_AE182F4ECAFE - For great chat.

Offline Forested665

  • Forum Member
  • Linux:2003 FreeBSD:2004 Debian/BSD developer:2006
Re: Some versions of Windows 7 worth it, others not
« Reply #3 on: July 16, 2009, 04:01:04 pm »
But the devil's in the drivers: many manufacturers adamantly refuse to spend the money to create 64-bit drivers for older hardware. After all, they make money by selling new hardware, and 64-bit compatibility doesn't rate very high on the profit-center scorecard.



most of the 32 bit drivers work as well.
Your flash drive and your camera and your ipods arent 64bit and wont benefit from the driver.
BSD -  The Daemons Are No Longer Just Inside My Head.

Offline White Stripes

  • Core
  • *****
  • ***
  • Je suis aimé
Re: Some versions of Windows 7 worth it, others not
« Reply #4 on: July 16, 2009, 11:29:34 pm »
Quote
Your flash drive and your camera and your ipods arent 64bit and wont benefit from the driver.

er... thats usb mass storage... comes -with- windows... (itunes just rides on top of it for the ipod... dont even need itunes for the ipod to work anyway (at least the ones ive tinkered with)... just drag and drop files onto the drive the ipod shows as...)

i say 'meh' to the whole thing... VLC is FOSS so its on linux... and if you are using other FOSS software to 'patch up' win7 theres no point in purchasing it in the first place unless you are a gamer...

Offline Forested665

  • Forum Member
  • Linux:2003 FreeBSD:2004 Debian/BSD developer:2006
Re: Some versions of Windows 7 worth it, others not
« Reply #5 on: July 17, 2009, 01:05:37 am »
another note worth mentioning is that vista takes up about 3.8 gigs on the dvd.
and if 7 has more code.. how do they intend to fit both 32 and 64 on one dvd?
BSD -  The Daemons Are No Longer Just Inside My Head.

Offline ñòóKýçrÕôK

  • my name is nooks, and I approve this message
  • MX Hosts
  • *****
  • Dream BIG, Live BIGGER!!
Re: Some versions of Windows 7 worth it, others not
« Reply #6 on: July 17, 2009, 02:30:53 am »
how do they intend to fit both 32 and 64 on one dvd?
The same way they always did. The Vista disc had both 32 bit and 64 bit installs on them also, along with all available versions. The setup.ini file in the i386 folder (I believe) is what tells the disc to install Home version or Ultimate version.
When you wake up each morning always try to remember tomorrow is never your option, it's God's. Love like you want to. Live like you aren't afraid. And ALWAYS try to remember that even if it seems personal it's never as important as something you may have forgotten to do today.

WinMXWorld.com Help_AE182F4EBABE - For WinMX help or help on other pc related matters.
WinMXWorld.com Cafe_AE182F4ECAFE - For great chat.

Offline Forested665

  • Forum Member
  • Linux:2003 FreeBSD:2004 Debian/BSD developer:2006
Re: Some versions of Windows 7 worth it, others not
« Reply #7 on: July 17, 2009, 09:50:21 pm »
really? then why did i have to pay 10 bux for microsoft to ship me a 64 bit dvd of home premium?
BSD -  The Daemons Are No Longer Just Inside My Head.

Offline Cobra

  • Forum Member
  • I'm not me.
Re: Some versions of Windows 7 worth it, others not
« Reply #8 on: July 18, 2009, 01:35:10 am »
Well, it looks like Home Edition for me....


XP Home Edition that is! :lol:
Downloading is an addiction I do not want to give up.

Offline Pri

  • MX Hosts
  • *****
  • *****
Re: Some versions of Windows 7 worth it, others not
« Reply #9 on: July 18, 2009, 11:13:43 pm »
I ordered Windows 7 Home Premium from Amazon for £44 inc Shipping the other day. Full retail boxed copy. The price exploded as soon as they ran out of pre-order stock.

Offline ñòóKýçrÕôK

  • my name is nooks, and I approve this message
  • MX Hosts
  • *****
  • Dream BIG, Live BIGGER!!
Re: Some versions of Windows 7 worth it, others not
« Reply #10 on: July 20, 2009, 09:37:24 pm »
really? then why did i have to pay 10 bux for microsoft to ship me a 64 bit dvd of home premium?
Perhaps they saw you coming
When you wake up each morning always try to remember tomorrow is never your option, it's God's. Love like you want to. Live like you aren't afraid. And ALWAYS try to remember that even if it seems personal it's never as important as something you may have forgotten to do today.

WinMXWorld.com Help_AE182F4EBABE - For WinMX help or help on other pc related matters.
WinMXWorld.com Cafe_AE182F4ECAFE - For great chat.

Offline Forested665

  • Forum Member
  • Linux:2003 FreeBSD:2004 Debian/BSD developer:2006
Re: Some versions of Windows 7 worth it, others not
« Reply #11 on: July 20, 2009, 09:39:05 pm »
or perhaps the only thing written on vista dvds OTHER THEN ULTIMATE was the 32bit version.
BSD -  The Daemons Are No Longer Just Inside My Head.

Offline ñòóKýçrÕôK

  • my name is nooks, and I approve this message
  • MX Hosts
  • *****
  • Dream BIG, Live BIGGER!!
Re: Some versions of Windows 7 worth it, others not
« Reply #12 on: July 20, 2009, 11:00:12 pm »
Ok so I did a little reading on this and here's what I gather. If you want Windows 32bit and don't have a dvdrom you can buy a Windows 32bit cd to install it with (at least up to Vista, not sure about 7). The DVD itself will be either 32bit or 64bit and what determines which you install is the key and the setup.ini. So what I say to you is your $10 64bit disc is also capable of installing 32bit Vista but you would have to change how the ini file reads for the setup AND have a 32bit Vista key to do it. A way you can test and see if I'm right or wrong is if you have a definate 32bit vista disc image it and image the 64bit, then copy the setup ini form your 32bit disc over to the 64bit disc image and then during setup use the 32bit key and see if it works like that. I'd be willing to bet money it would.  :nerd:
When you wake up each morning always try to remember tomorrow is never your option, it's God's. Love like you want to. Live like you aren't afraid. And ALWAYS try to remember that even if it seems personal it's never as important as something you may have forgotten to do today.

WinMXWorld.com Help_AE182F4EBABE - For WinMX help or help on other pc related matters.
WinMXWorld.com Cafe_AE182F4ECAFE - For great chat.

Offline Forested665

  • Forum Member
  • Linux:2003 FreeBSD:2004 Debian/BSD developer:2006
Re: Some versions of Windows 7 worth it, others not
« Reply #13 on: July 21, 2009, 02:27:11 am »
i have one key. It let me install the 32 bit version that came in the box. I filled out the little card for a 64bit vista dvd and they shipped it. same key let me install 64.
BSD -  The Daemons Are No Longer Just Inside My Head.

Offline ñòóKýçrÕôK

  • my name is nooks, and I approve this message
  • MX Hosts
  • *****
  • Dream BIG, Live BIGGER!!
Re: Some versions of Windows 7 worth it, others not
« Reply #14 on: July 21, 2009, 06:17:13 am »
Then it must be in the setup.ini file then. When I talked to the windows lady about my vista ultimate she told me that even though I had vista ultimate on there they would send me a valid vista home key and disc and then I could just add my key to the os I had installed and the key would make it vista home. So to test it you would need only to image the 64bit disc then insert the setup.ini file from what you're calling the 32bit vista disc and I bet it would install 32bit windows from what you're calling the 64bit disc.
When you wake up each morning always try to remember tomorrow is never your option, it's God's. Love like you want to. Live like you aren't afraid. And ALWAYS try to remember that even if it seems personal it's never as important as something you may have forgotten to do today.

WinMXWorld.com Help_AE182F4EBABE - For WinMX help or help on other pc related matters.
WinMXWorld.com Cafe_AE182F4ECAFE - For great chat.

Offline Pri

  • MX Hosts
  • *****
  • *****
Re: Some versions of Windows 7 worth it, others not
« Reply #15 on: July 21, 2009, 09:21:58 am »
This is how Microsoft did it:

If you bought an OEM edition:
Separate 64-bit and 32-bit OEM editions of all SKU's entered the Market, you picked which one to buy and installed. This is true for all SKU's of Vista. Basic/Premium/Business/Ultimate etc

If you bought a Retail edition:
Ultimate was the only Retail edition to include both 32-bit and 64-bit discs. All other editions only came with a 32-bit disc in the box and you (the user) had to contact Microsoft to get the 64-bit disc.

How Keys Work between 32/64:
If you have an OEM Key it works on both 32-bit & 64-bit discs. If you have a Retail key it works on both 32-bit & 64-bit discs. What this means is, all you need is a Key then you can obtain a disc from anywhere.

Are all discs equal?
There are only 2 different discs. 32-bit and 64-bit. Which means the disc you get inside a Home Premium package is identical to a disc you get in an Ultimate package. It is your Serial which determines which components get installed/left out during installation. You can test this yourself by placing any Vista install DVD you have in to your computer and as it reaches the Serial input leave it blank. Vista will warn you, continue onwards and you will be presented with every version of Vista from which you can select one to install. You will then have 30 days after installation to supply a serial for the edition you installed.

I hope this clears things up. Windows 7 should be different with both 32-bit and 64-bit versions in every Retail box. OEM editions will probably still ship with only one disc either 32-bit or 64-bit and not both.

Offline Forested665

  • Forum Member
  • Linux:2003 FreeBSD:2004 Debian/BSD developer:2006
Re: Some versions of Windows 7 worth it, others not
« Reply #16 on: July 21, 2009, 04:20:57 pm »
i have a retail copy.
BSD -  The Daemons Are No Longer Just Inside My Head.

WinMX World :: Forum  |  Discussion  |  WinMx World News  |  Some versions of Windows 7 worth it, others not
 

gfxgfx
gfx
©2005-2021 WinMXWorld.com. All Rights Reserved.
SMF 2.0.18 | SMF © 2021, Simple Machines | Terms and Policies
Page created in 0.027 seconds with 24 queries.
Helios Multi © Bloc
gfx
Powered by MySQL Powered by PHP Valid XHTML 1.0! Valid CSS!