gfxgfx
 
Please login or register.

Login with username, password and session length
 
gfx gfx
gfx
76506 Posts in 13435 Topics by 2084 Members - Latest Member: MagixMark September 26, 2020, 08:13:49 am
*
gfx*gfx
gfx
WinMX World :: Forum  |  Discussion  |  WinMx World News  |  Government reveals superfast broadband plans (Update)
gfx
gfxgfx
 

Author Topic: Government reveals superfast broadband plans (Update)  (Read 1123 times)

0 Members and 1 Guest are viewing this topic.

Offline DaBees-Knees

  • WMW Team
  • *****
Government reveals superfast broadband plans (Update)
« on: December 06, 2010, 05:40:57 am »
http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/technology-11922424

Quote
Every community in the UK will gain access to superfast broadband by 2015 under plans due to be outlined. The private sector is to deliver broadband to two thirds of the UK. Other, mainly rural, areas will receive public funds to build a "digital hub" with a fibre optic internet connection.

                                                                                     
                                                                   The government says faster broadband will save taxpayers billions of pounds

Ministers says they aim for the UK to have Europe's best broadband network. This will create "hundreds of thousands of jobs and add billions to our GDP", says Culture Secretary Jeremy Hunt.

The government has earmarked £830m for the scheme, with the money coming from the BBC licence fee.

Mr Hunt says the strategy will give the country Europe's best broadband network by 2015 and will be central to economic growth and the delivery of future public services, dependent on quick, reliable access to the internet. He added that wider access to broadband services also helped "build a fairer and more prosperous society", as well as "saving billions of pounds of taxpayers' money".

A recent study by the regulator Ofcom revealed that fewer than 1% of UK homes have a superfast broadband connection, considered to be at least 24Mbps.

However, the government does not define the minimum speed it hopes superfast services will achieve.

"In order to determine what constitutes 'the best' network in Europe, we will adopt a scorecard which will focus on four headline indicators: speed, coverage, price and choice," the strategy says. "These will be made up of a number of composite measures rather than a single factor such as headline download speed."

Difficult-to-reach areas
 
Much of the detail of the government's broadband strategy has previously been announced, including how it will be funded and the coalition's desire to see everyone able to access broadband with speeds of at least 2Mbps by 2015.

The previous Labour government promised the same minimum speed for everyone by 2012.

But the coalition says that it will now roll together its drive for universal access with its strategy to deliver superfast broadband. At the heart of this is a plan to create a "digital hub" in every community by 2015.

"Our goal today is very simple: to deliver a fibre point in every community in the UK by the end of this parliament," Mr Hunt is expected to say when he delivers a speech outlining the strategy at the London headquarters of computer giant Microsoft. Communities and local operators would then be expected to take on the responsibility for extending the network to individual homes.

The coalition has earmarked £50m of the £830m to pay for trials - particularly in difficult-to-reach areas - to see how it can ensure that superfast fibre optic broadband reaches these communities in the timescale.

These new trials will run alongside projects in North Yorkshire, Herefordshire, Cumbria and the Highlands and Islands, announced earlier this year.

"We will be inviting local bodies and devolved administrations right across the UK to propose new testing projects in April of next year, with a view to making a final selection in May," Mr Hunt will say. In his speech, Mr Hunt will also confirm that the government will sell off parts of the spectrum in 2011 that could be used for mobile broadband services.

Back aches
 
The strategy was welcomed by the Independent Networks Cooperative Association (Inca), a group of community broadband schemes. "It is great that the government has taken up the 'digital village pump' idea that has been put forward by a number of broadband champions," said Malcolm Corbett, CEO of Inca. "This could go a long way to tackling one of the big problems with all rural broadband services - the costs of backhaul - the connection from the community to the internet.

"However, more needs to be done and the strategy misses some obvious opportunities, not least the way that business rates are levied on fibre." The current regime of levies on fibre installations has been a major bone of contention, with smaller firms claiming they are discriminated against compared to giants BT and Virgin Media.

Inca's view was echoed by Trefor Davies, CTO of communications firm Timico. "The problem with this is that it is effectively handing the cash to BT because the fibre tax system will make BT the only company able to offer a competitive backhaul," he said.

Mr Hunt said that BT had signalled that it would match the government's £830m of funding if it was awarded the contract to provide the infrastructure for the community hubs. The firm said that if it was to "win funds on that scale" it would be able to provide fibre to 90% of the UK.

Under current plans, its fibre will extend to 66% of the UK, although only a quarter of this would be the faster Fibre-To-The-Home (FTTH) technology.

The rest is the slower Fibre-To-The-Cabinet (FTTC), similar to the government's "digital hub" plans.



Rory Cellan-Jones
Technology correspondent, BBC News
--------------------------------------------------------------------------------

The coalition started with two challenges - how to get a minimum level of broadband to everyone and how to make sure that parts of Britain didn't get left out as superfast networks rolled out. Ministers have decided to roll the two tasks together into one; the aim is that those who have missed out so far will leapfrog straight from dial-up to the superfast era.

The onus will be on local authorities to work with community groups and big businesses to work out how to build the digital hub in each place. There's plenty of scope for disagreement there, as rival firms and different technologies bid for the limited pool of cash.

So how does this compare with what the last government was planning? In one way it's less ambitious - the 2012 target for universal coverage has been put back to 2015; in another way more, with a bold target of Europe's best broadband by then.

And how will that be measured? By performance on price, choice, coverage and speed. Britain does well right now on the first three, but is way down Europe's speed league. Getting to the top of the table in five years won't be easy - the likes of Sweden and the Netherlands aren't just going to stand still.

Promises, promises!  8)


Offline Pri

  • MX Hosts
  • *****
  • *****
Re: Government reveals superfast broadband plans (Update)
« Reply #1 on: December 06, 2010, 10:42:21 am »
With the internet being general use and capable of delivering any type of content I'm of the opinion that all other means of digital content delivery should be used to sustain it.

An example of what I mean is at the moment we have wireless spectrum that is reserved for TV, Radio, Mobile Phone networks etc - I think all these should be switched over to delivering wireless country blanketing internet from which devices can connect to receive the same content they currently receive now over their proprietary non-IP based connections.

Now I know it is a crazy idea and it's unfeasible economically at this point (we just did a digital switchover and doing that again would be next to impossible politically) but I feel eventually it will happen every medium capable of transferring data long distances will eventually become a standard way to access the internet.

We saw how fast the internet grew when we allowed access to it through pre-existing phone networks. And then we updated that approach with ADSL pumping broadband over the same cables. Imagine what if we took this approach of turning older preexisting communication lines and broadening their connectivity to allow internet access.

There are a few countries and companies around the world which are already embracing such an approach with WiMAX in America, Europe and far east Asia. USB 3G modems for laptop users, even the iPad and Kindle use 3G for Internet access anywhere. And in New York City some internet providers now offer high speed internet through your electrical sockets! - In the UK a company has begun laying fiber optics through our sewer system in London and Manchester. Re-purposing a pre-built infrastructure to hold a cable about the thickness of a thumb without the need to dig up any roads.

It is this kind of thinking - recycling if you will - that will enable the Internet to grow and for everyone to benefit, not only end users but businesses who cant currently compete due to rules on spectrum use and other such nonsense.

Offline White Stripes

  • Core
  • *****
  • ***
  • Je suis aimé
Re: Government reveals superfast broadband plans (Update)
« Reply #2 on: December 07, 2010, 05:17:50 am »
Quote
And in New York City some internet providers now offer high speed internet through your electrical sockets!

BPL --- this was going to go into very widespread use until the amateur (ham) radio operators screamed of 'interference' with their toys...

Quote
iPad and Kindle use 3G for Internet access anywhere.

AT&Ts 3G in the US is about to collapse due to the 'switching' used to save battery power in iProducts.... even before that the 'spread out' nature of the US disallowed even decent coverage for simple voice calls....


The UK may be ready for this kind of tech.... the US... far from it... so you folks over the pond will get the high speeds way before we do...

but putting everything on the web is kinda like putting all of ones eggs in the same basket.... there needs to be some kind of other system left...

Offline Pri

  • MX Hosts
  • *****
  • *****
Re: Government reveals superfast broadband plans (Update)
« Reply #3 on: December 07, 2010, 06:07:15 am »
Quote
And in New York City some internet providers now offer high speed internet through your electrical sockets!

BPL --- this was going to go into very widespread use until the amateur (ham) radio operators screamed of 'interference' with their toys...

Quote
iPad and Kindle use 3G for Internet access anywhere.

AT&Ts 3G in the US is about to collapse due to the 'switching' used to save battery power in iProducts.... even before that the 'spread out' nature of the US disallowed even decent coverage for simple voice calls....


The UK may be ready for this kind of tech.... the US... far from it... so you folks over the pond will get the high speeds way before we do...

but putting everything on the web is kinda like putting all of ones eggs in the same basket.... there needs to be some kind of other system left...

You know how the internet works it isn't putting your eggs in one basket when the internet is made up of millions of machines all around the globe. Even if parts of a country are severed off from the rest of the world the internet within that country still works. The internet is self-healing finding alternate routes for data delivery and although it is vulnerable right now due to dependence on physical cables like the ones between continents under the sea that can be eliminated if other pathways were opened.

If anything this would strengthen our ability to deliver content. It worked for AC power, some may have argued why put all our eggs in the AC basket when we have DC, why build the internet on TCP/IP when we had alternatives. The world needs a standard way to deliver all kinds of information and we needed it 20 years ago, now it's time to fulfill that vision.

About America - Your country is very large and the places with the best internet connectivity are cities. Rural areas where there is no commercial incentive will always lag behind. That is the same situation in every country including the United Kingdom. The only real way to deliver fast internet to these areas is through government subsidies or direct government development and United States is not willing to do that. The UK government is (as this topic reveals) as are many other countries in Europe.

The way I see things is America fell behind a long time ago when it comes to technology, digital infrastructure and individual freedoms but that is there problem the rest of the world is moving on without them.

Offline White Stripes

  • Core
  • *****
  • ***
  • Je suis aimé
Re: Government reveals superfast broadband plans (Update)
« Reply #4 on: December 07, 2010, 09:26:36 am »
Quote
The way I see things is America fell behind a long time ago when it comes to technology, digital infrastructure and individual freedoms but that is there problem the rest of the world is moving on without them.

thats putting it gently.... it wasnt until 1947 that electricity was delivered out to the area i live now.... phone? heh... right... i think we migrated from 'party lines' in the late 70s but id have to ask my mom...

when 'made in japan' became the top of the line products in the 80s thats when we totally lost it.... i havent seen 'zenith' except on rebranded stuff but pioneer is still going strong (best audio systems you can buy that are in a practical price range).....

but when it comes to putting everything on the web even if its multipath there are still points of failure... lets say DSL gives out but the phone line still works... need to call for help? hope you dont have a 'dry line' and cant use the regular phone system.... ....there will always need to be alternate methods on alternate routes that dont go over the internet...

even the power grid with all its mutiple paths is still prone to massive failure... there simply isnt enough redundancy yet to keep up with electricity let alone communications....

IP/everything will... if it happenes... be something i will be very old and grey.... or dead... before it does....

personally... id just like to see a power grid that works 24/7 365 atm... ...im tired of resetting the clock on the VCR...


PS as for AC vs DC in the power grid DC needs thicker wire which would require it to be run underground... also it cannot be 'stepped up' or 'stepped down' with transformers..... DC was found infeesable for extensive use.... http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/War_of_Currents ... tho its interesting to find 'mixed' today... switchmode psus for just one example....

Offline Pri

  • MX Hosts
  • *****
  • *****
Re: Government reveals superfast broadband plans (Update)
« Reply #5 on: December 07, 2010, 12:50:28 pm »
Quote
The way I see things is America fell behind a long time ago when it comes to technology, digital infrastructure and individual freedoms but that is there problem the rest of the world is moving on without them.

thats putting it gently.... it wasnt until 1947 that electricity was delivered out to the area i live now.... phone? heh... right... i think we migrated from 'party lines' in the late 70s but id have to ask my mom...

when 'made in japan' became the top of the line products in the 80s thats when we totally lost it.... i havent seen 'zenith' except on rebranded stuff but pioneer is still going strong (best audio systems you can buy that are in a practical price range).....

but when it comes to putting everything on the web even if its multipath there are still points of failure... lets say DSL gives out but the phone line still works... need to call for help? hope you dont have a 'dry line' and cant use the regular phone system.... ....there will always need to be alternate methods on alternate routes that dont go over the internet...

even the power grid with all its mutiple paths is still prone to massive failure... there simply isnt enough redundancy yet to keep up with electricity let alone communications....

IP/everything will... if it happenes... be something i will be very old and grey.... or dead... before it does....

personally... id just like to see a power grid that works 24/7 365 atm... ...im tired of resetting the clock on the VCR...


PS as for AC vs DC in the power grid DC needs thicker wire which would require it to be run underground... also it cannot be 'stepped up' or 'stepped down' with transformers..... DC was found infeesable for extensive use.... http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/War_of_Currents ... tho its interesting to find 'mixed' today... switchmode psus for just one example....

Come on you don't think I don't know this?

I don't really think there will be an issue with what your talking about because in my idea you wouldn't just have 1 connection to the internet. You would have wireless access through your mobile, wireless access through your TV, ground access through fiber and electric grid. All of these would operate independently of eachother with their own IP Addresses so even if your fiber connection went down you still have over the air stuff for calling technical support.

That is the whole point of using all available spectrum for it. Cant get a signal at 800MHz? go to 900MHz and connect to a different internet mast etc - That's the idea anyways.

Offline White Stripes

  • Core
  • *****
  • ***
  • Je suis aimé
Re: Government reveals superfast broadband plans (Update)
« Reply #6 on: December 07, 2010, 07:51:06 pm »
so what do you do in a situation where, for some reason, these communication devices cant get an IP address... ?

multipath but still only one protocol is still putting all your eggs in one basket... ...there will always be a need for something that uses its own very very simple (IP is simple? no it gets simpler than that..) but known/open protocol thats seperate from IP and the frequencies that use it...

Offline Pri

  • MX Hosts
  • *****
  • *****
Re: Government reveals superfast broadband plans (Update)
« Reply #7 on: December 07, 2010, 09:09:51 pm »
so what do you do in a situation where, for some reason, these communication devices cant get an IP address... ?

multipath but still only one protocol is still putting all your eggs in one basket... ...there will always be a need for something that uses its own very very simple (IP is simple? no it gets simpler than that..) but known/open protocol thats seperate from IP and the frequencies that use it...

I don't agree. Simple as that.

WinMX World :: Forum  |  Discussion  |  WinMx World News  |  Government reveals superfast broadband plans (Update)
 

gfxgfx
gfx
©2005-2020 WinMXWorld.com. All Rights Reserved.
SMF 2.0.17 | SMF © 2019, Simple Machines | Terms and Policies
Page created in 0.027 seconds with 24 queries.
Helios Multi © Bloc
gfx
Powered by MySQL Powered by PHP Valid XHTML 1.0! Valid CSS!