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WinMX World :: Forum  |  Discussion  |  WinMx World News  |  Windows XP forever? The OS that just won't die (Viewpoint)
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Author Topic: Windows XP forever? The OS that just won't die (Viewpoint)  (Read 1743 times)

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Offline DaBees-Knees

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Windows XP forever? The OS that just won't die (Viewpoint)
« on: August 08, 2009, 04:16:49 pm »
http://www.betanews.com/article/Windows-XP-forever-The-OS-that-just-wont-die/1249582039

Quote
Microsoft has a problem on its hands. Or more precisely one problem with three seemingly contradictory components:

Windows XP is too good for its own good.

It needs to die for the company's sake.

It won't die because nothing else -- not even Windows 7 -- currently approaches it.

We're closing in on eight years since XP first hit the market and began the long process of making us finally forget we ever used Windows 95, 98, and Windows Me. By anyone's standards, it's been one of Microsoft's most visibly successful products. It still runs on some 60% of all PCs years after it was supposed to have been retired as a front-line offering. It's sold around 800 million copies since its initial release. And if piracy is the sincerest form of flattery, hundreds of millions more illegal copies are in use across the globe. In an age where icons are in desperately short supply, this is as iconic a product as it gets.

Dragging on the future
The problem with XP is this: The longer it sticks around and continues to tug at the heartstrings of end-users and corporate IT decision-makers alike, the bigger a drag it becomes on Microsoft's bottom line. For a company accustomed to earning triple-digit revenue from every OS it sells, Microsoft can't be pleased with the paltry $30 or so it makes from each retail sale of XP. Although Microsoft obviously recognizes that $300 netbooks and $400-to-$500 mainstream laptops mean the good old days of high margin OS sales are over, it still wants us to add Windows 7 to our wish list to continue to drive its Windows revenue stream, albeit at a reduced rate.

Unfortunately for Microsoft, buyers don't seem to have latched on to the need to upgrade. If it ain't broke, the saying goes, don't fix it. And XP ain't broke by a longshot, so cost-sensitive consumer and enterprise buyers don't have much incentive to make the jump just yet. Like Vista before it, they'll get a new OS when they buy new hardware or refresh their client environments. But as long as they're either filing for unemployment benefits or laying off workers, new hardware won't be their top priority. Even if they're still gainfully employed, upgrading will take a back seat to keeping their heads above water.

Increasingly, a marginally more capable new technology platform is seen as a want and not a need. As good as Windows 7 seems to be, Microsoft needs to convince the rest of the world that it offers more than a marginally better value proposition for recession-weary buyers.

Good enough is good enough
Microsoft's value proposition for Vista -- more features, more capability -- was hatched when market conditions were significantly more positive than they are now. The message has fallen largely flat in an era when consumers are increasingly questioning whether bigger really is better. The positioning of Windows 7 as a leaner and meaner alternative that plays just as nicely with low-end netbooks as it does full-on workstations is designed to make us forget about the company's missteps in positioning Vista as the heir apparent. But in doing so, Microsoft has prompted a growing realization that it already has such a lean-and-mean, all-things-to-all-people product, and it's called Windows XP.

XP is a good enough operating system that despite early deservedly rave reviews of Windows 7 (and positive comments from Betanews), many friends and colleagues with whom I associate are quietly ignoring Windows 7, and hoping to stick with XP for as long as their current hardware holds out. If the Windows franchise has had a backbone through the somewhat stomach churning Vista era, XP has been it. It's not a product that will go quietly into the night.

Despite XP's position at the center of Microsoft's OS universe, though, it isn't immune to long-term reality. At some point, every OS fades from the landscape. Just last week, the ancient Compaq Contura 486-based laptop with the glorious trackball that I had been using as an occasional note-taking machine finally bit the dust, and the era of DOS 6 and Windows 3.1 came to an end for me. As ancient as this OS platform was, it just worked, and it fit the relatively simple needs that surrounded its continued, if dusty, existence.

Is XP Microsoft's saviour?
Windows XP isn't nearly so dusty, so it's infinitely more capable than my admittedly Pre-Cambrian Windows 3.1-based machine of existing on its own in a home or office setting in the absence of anything newer. It connects to the Internet, corporate network resources, and a large enough cross-section of PCs and peripherals. With a bit of administrative oversight to ensure all the latest patches, fixes, and updates are applied, it's relatively secure, too. And unlike most versions of Vista, XP runs nicely on all that older hardware still hanging around because recession-challenged end-users and IT shops believe they're too budget-challenged to replace it.

“If the Windows franchise has had a backbone through the somewhat stomach churning Vista era, XP has been it. It's not a product that will go quietly into the night.”

It's also given Microsoft critical momentum in the hardware industry's sole bright spot: netbooks. Microsoft may not enjoy sitting in the cheap seats, but XP's stopgap save in this market kept the Windows brand visible -- and relevant -- until Microsoft could come up with a longer term solution. If anything, someone owes XP a thank you.

We're barely a couple of months away from general availability for Windows 7. Even then, it'll take months before we know how successful it is. Microsoft's betting the company on this new OS because it has no choice. If it can't keep folks buying new versions of Windows, it'll need to find a new business to replace it, and fast. But the overwhelming success of its legacy XP brand, coupled with the market's newfound focus on frugality and sensibility, could derail this plan before it even gets off the ground.

The value proposition for Windows 7 needs to be compelling enough to get the legions of Windows XP users convinced that good enough is no longer good enough. That's easier said than done, and given XP's cockroach-like survival skills, it's anybody's guess as to whether Microsoft will be able to pull it off.

I found that an interesting article. I'll be interested in any comments you may have.  :)

Offline Trestor

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Re: Windows XP forever? The OS that just won't die (Viewpoint)
« Reply #1 on: August 09, 2009, 02:44:19 am »
The essential problems of win7 (to me) are:
1. Many configuration choices have been removed completely;
2. Overall, more steps are required to carry out an action compared to doing the same job in xp.

The net result (in my view) is that win7 is better than xp in some ways, worse in others, doesn't show itself as a vast leap ahead of xp, and ultimately fails to satisfy. As a result I've gone back to xp. I suspect many will question the need to buy win7 since xp is fairly well sorted and does the essential things with less bother than win7.

I don't prefer xp; I prefer using win7. When it's good win7 is very good, but it's bad aspects make it a deal breaker for me. I'm using xp because it's not possible to customize win7 to work the way I want it to compared to xp, and the nuisance value of win7 is too high. All just my opinion, of course.




Offline Cobra

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Re: Windows XP forever? The OS that just won't die (Viewpoint)
« Reply #2 on: August 09, 2009, 05:55:00 am »
I know that I have said some of this before, but this seems to be as good of a time as any to say the same things again.

Whomever has been doing marketing research and product management (or whatever the jobs are) for Microsoft need to get their heads out of the clouds, come back to Earth for a bit, and get a few things through their heads:

1) Not everyone is going to throw out their old computer or operating system and buy new just because a new operating system exists. For those who don't, cost isn't always the only factor. I don't go out and buy a new car every couple of years just because a new one is made. For many there first has to be fault in the old one before a new one is even considered. This is why, in the same respect, some people don't even update their service packs or add patches even when warned. As long as everything is working well, there is no reason to change because change may result in things no longer working as well.

2) Not everyone is interested in "more bells and whistles". Many people just want "faster, simpler, and more efficient". To so many people, that's what XP already is.

3) Compatibility with software is always an issue. Again, not everyone wants or cares to dive into something new, and that may be exactly what they have to do. They could even be eager to try the new OS at first but are then taken aback when they learn that their favorite software is no longer compatible, and there will never be a compatible update because the company is now defunct or the software is something bought on a CD or DVD (in particular: games). I see nothing wrong with looking to the future yet remaining 100% compatible with the past "just in case", but unfortunately that's one place that Microsoft appears to keep stepping out of bounds. They want you to buy new while at the same time hoping to push the past away so that you basically have to start over, but the outcry causes them to meet the customer part way and add a little bit of compatibility or old OS emulation to first draw them in hoping they will eventually abandon everything old and move on.... but that gets back to my first point.


So now, in this day and age where computers are so common, are practically in every household already that would ever get one, people are walking around with computers in their pockets (instead of it still being the newest cool thing for people to start investing in as it was a few decades ago), and a generation of people are now so much more computer-wise than they used to be that they are no longer willing to just accept whatever Microsoft chooses to create, the question that the company should actually be asking themselves is this: "What exactly does the consumer want (and not want) in a new operating system?" and then tailor-design the next OS to meet what is being asked for, allowing for practically anything and everything to be easily turned off or removed if a particular customer doesn't want to use "that feature".
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Offline Trestor

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Re: Windows XP forever? The OS that just won't die (Viewpoint)
« Reply #3 on: August 09, 2009, 06:42:38 am »
Excellently argued, Cobra.




Offline White Stripes

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Re: Windows XP forever? The OS that just won't die (Viewpoint)
« Reply #4 on: August 09, 2009, 05:49:53 pm »
i found this interesting;

Quote
Just last week, the ancient Compaq Contura 486-based laptop with the glorious trackball that I had been using as an occasional note-taking machine finally bit the dust, and the era of DOS 6 and Windows 3.1 came to an end for me.

the OS isnt as tied to the hardware as many think.... you'd be surprised on how new of hardware that something as old as windows 3.1 will still run... (@32 mb of ram you dont even really need to bother with a page/swap file... granted past a certain point with new hardware some definite geekery is required...)

and of course as always windows 7 (and anything newer) is going to have linux to compete with as well.... as the music industry can attest to; its a bit hard to compete with free...

Offline Forested665

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Re: Windows XP forever? The OS that just won't die (Viewpoint)
« Reply #5 on: August 10, 2009, 01:23:08 am »
Trestor can i ask you what glorius leap xp makes from windows 2000?
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Offline Trestor

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Re: Windows XP forever? The OS that just won't die (Viewpoint)
« Reply #6 on: August 10, 2009, 02:11:02 pm »
Trestor can i ask you what glorius leap xp makes from windows 2000?

None that I know of. I presume you're referring to my comment that I don't see Win7 as being a vast leap ahead of XP. Whether XP was a leap over W2000 or not doesn't strike me as being relevant to whether Win7 is a leap ahead of XP.

Perhaps you are saying that because XP wasn't a leap ahead of W2000, therefore Win7 shouldn't be rejected because it's not a leap ahead of XP. Certainly, if that is your opinion, or the opinion of anyone else. I was merely expressing my own opinion of Win7, based upon my own experience of it's good and bad features, to see if anyone agreed with me or not. Most people in my experience think I talk absolute rubbish, so if you disagree with me there is nothing new to the experience. It's not as if my opinions are worth anything. Why not tell us what you think?




Offline Forested665

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Re: Windows XP forever? The OS that just won't die (Viewpoint)
« Reply #7 on: August 10, 2009, 05:43:41 pm »
I think if there wasnt a need for a new operating system or that xp didnt meet the scalability needs for upcoming technologies then we would indeed still be buying computers with xp and xp-64. what would interest me more in your veiw point would be why you use xp instead of 2k. if its what was on your computer and you stick to your previous statement then i dont logically see why you would have a new computer downgraded from 7 if you were to purchase one.
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Offline White Stripes

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Re: Windows XP forever? The OS that just won't die (Viewpoint)
« Reply #8 on: August 10, 2009, 09:17:03 pm »
XP vs 2k -- the two biggest differences;

XP = better 3d vidcard (and thus game) support
2k = better networking support (no limits on 'half open' connections and more options for user accounts by default)

Offline Trestor

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Re: Windows XP forever? The OS that just won't die (Viewpoint)
« Reply #9 on: August 11, 2009, 12:30:57 am »
I do think you are reading too much into my statements. Here is what I am saying:
-I do not deny the need for a new operating system.
- I am not discussing W2000. Whether it is good, bad or indifferent in comparison to XP doesn't matter to me.
- As to why I favor XP over W2000; I don't. I don't care; I did not say I did. The OP article was about XP and Win7, and so my comments were based on this. If a person wants to use W2000 I have no comment about that. If you want to write a post about W2000 and Win7 then feel free to do so, but don't harass me for not talking about W2000 or claiming I favor XP over it.
- I didn't say that one should downgrade a new computer from Win7 to anything else; that's what you claimed that I said. My singular point (restating it yet again) was that weighing the good and bad points of Win7 leaves me with the opinion that Win7 has enough things wrong with it that I prefer to use XP and have gone back to using it, even though I like the good parts of Win7 more. Another person may think differently and not be troubled by the things I don't like and be content with Win7.

Really, that's all I have been saying, and this is all I'm going to say. My original post was a very unimportant one and hasn't warranted all this blather.

I have reread my original post in this thread and it still seems reasonably argued and plainly is nothing more than an opinion piece, albeit presented in a disappointed tone, yet accurately expresses my opinions and I don't see anything I need to retract, feel ashamed of or justify. I've had enough of this game and I won't be discussing this any further. I would rather see this thread return to the topic.




Offline DaBees-Knees

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Re: Windows XP forever? The OS that just won't die (Viewpoint)
« Reply #10 on: August 11, 2009, 06:40:41 am »
Forested,
              When I said, I would be interested in your comments, that didn't include harassing another user giving an honest opinion. If you have an opinion on the original article by all means give it.

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Offline ñòóKýçrÕôK

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Re: Windows XP forever? The OS that just won't die (Viewpoint)
« Reply #11 on: August 11, 2009, 08:31:04 pm »
Not to try n hash it out or drag it back up about Win2k vs XP vs Win7 as this thread is about XP hanging on and probably going to make it difficult for Win7 but the one thing I noticced different between Win2K vs XP is XP handled drivers better. Now when I say this my only example was the drivers for an ATI All In Wonder card and onboard Realtek sound drivers. When I built my original system I used Win2K Pro as my OS. It was nice, low mem use, high output, and all in all top knotch for the time. But, the vid was always choppy as well as the sound as even though the drivers were for XP/Win2K/98SE (at the time there was no Win Vista) for both the vid and the sound installs. After about a year of running Win2K I decided that I had finally heard enough good about Windows XP to go ahead and try it out. Figured worse come to worse I could always go back to Win2K. All the same hardware, all the same drivers and XP handled them beautifully. It was like running my pc for the first time ever and really "liking it". The XP handled the hardware and the drivers much better than the Win2K. That said let me get on track here.

I recently tried the originl beta  Win7 install from MS and it was pretty, definately different, and nice to use. A little buggy for my hardware considering there was no driver support for my sound card and the vista driver albeit force installed, and force loaded, worked "OK". Had to force vid drivers for my old nvidia card as there was no support for those either. At least not right off. I downloaded them later after the install from Windows Updates. Once the setup was all set n done I put a couple games on and the play was good. I liked the way that Win7 kind of glorifieed the vid and seemed to set it out. Something even my Vista didn't seem to do. Always seemed to lack luster. Didn't notice this until I ran the Win7. There was also no support for my ethernet card. Not really a huge issue for me as I don't use it anyway. Win7 seemed to lean pretty heavy on my hard drives and appeared to go lighter on the processor usage which was exactly the opposite for my Win Vista. It seemed more reliant on processor use first, then memory and drives. After only about a month I think running the Win7 beta my drive that the OS was installed on crashed n burned so I had to re-setup. This time I went with Xp Pro SP3, because I seriously felt the heavy memory use and the read/write to the drives by Win7 had something to do with a relatively young 2 year old hard drive crashing and failing. Anyway since I've gone back to XP I can say all my drivers work great again. No forcing this or forcing that. It's running great with very few issues at all that I can tell. All my hardware is supported still and plenty of updates still available for all of it. I'd say I'm good for at least 3 more years barring MS doesn't just toss out support for XP altogether in an effort to get users to switch. Nearest I can tell most of my hardware will be unsupported by Win7 and seeing as I have approximately $2800 altogether in original and replacement parts since I built this machine I can't see me tossing it and going out and building a new machine just to get "The Precious" and use it. All in all if I had to say. If you have need for a new machine whether you wish to build it or buy one prebuilt with factory hardware and software on it then by all means, go for Win7, value wise depends on which version you need of what versions they offer of Win7. The hardware will likely be supported and it should be an enjoyable experience. Me myself I have too much invested in the pc I'm running so I think I'll stick with it and my XP for at least 2 more years or until some major peice of it dies and then I'll build a new ne and go with Win7. As for now my XP has a nice ballance between proc and mem and read/write to drive usage Which is something I really hope they worked on in Win7. But that's my thoughts on all of them, and tbh, I never really saw or noticed any real difference between WinXP and Win Vista as I never had all the issues that other users of Vista seemed to have or insist was the fault of Vista. Something I still say in probably at the least 80% of the cases was user problems blamed on Vista due to bad press.
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Offline White Stripes

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Re: Windows XP forever? The OS that just won't die (Viewpoint)
« Reply #12 on: August 12, 2009, 05:46:12 pm »
one problem with win2k that you may or may not have noticed is it doesnt turn acceleration all the way to 'full' by default... you have to go to the video and sound properties to set it to full.... 9 times out of 10 this will fix choppy sound and jerky video....

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